Powerful stuff, perspective

Glad that mental health is being discussed. There was/is such a stereotype around this, especially in professional sports (but reflected in society at large), so this is good to see.

Props to Lane (and Brooks) for being open about this.

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“LIke”

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As a military vet who is fighting the same demons I was incredibly impressed with the piece… kept everything to my self and tried to muddle through “the miltary way” and finally hit a wall. Glad to say I sought out help, recongnize my limitations, and try very hard not to put myself in a position to have such a negative reaction. But it was very enlightning to hear someone else and actually a pro athlete relatable to my own circumstances

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Glad to hear it, Moose. And thank you for your service. I mean it. My family has a genetic disposition to depression/anxiety so I’m no stranger to it either. The “tough it out” mentality in society has only exasperated the damage. I hope we are turning a corner when the toughest among us acknowledge it’s as real as any physical illness and in some cases life threatening.

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I’m still too pissed off to explain how much I like this, my own Rollercoaster with all that stuff and how it affected and affects those around me.

That I pick to stay with the one sports team in human history that elicits maximum anxiety, depression and anger is a monument to my own stubbornness, stupidity and resilience.

I mean, it’s basically, F You Fords, I can handle any level of mind-blowing horseshit you can throw at me . Should I though? I mean, at this point it’s really my only outlet for exploring just how much Schadenfreude and sardonic gallows humor can be stuffed into a human psyche. Haven’t reached my Mr Creosote moment…yet. Better get another bucket…

Maybe we are all just experiments being run by a higher power/intelligence and Cowboy fans are the control group…that would make sense…

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I am stubbornly loyal in my life in general. Give people second, third and fourth chances. Keep toxic people around longer than I should HC we go way back. I wonder if that’s a character trait that many of us share. My guess based on the experience of being a Lions fan is that many of us do.

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happy for you, my man! We all have stuff going on, and when we are open about it, it heals many people and brings us together. If we all knew what each other were going through, instead of seeing “an asshole,” or a “weirdo,” we could just love the humans through their “stuff”…if you are a human, you have “stuff.” Our stuff looks different but parallel to each other. If we knew each other, we’d love each other.

Tough it out = hide from yourself, learn ways to numb…and essentially…put yourself in a mental/energetic prison. The only way to be truly free is to be 100% vulnerable and authentic.

Authenticity breeds love and oneness. Authenticity is freedom. Learning ourselves is suuuuuch a big deal. It entails having a sensitivity to even know something is correctable in the first place.

Love you guys’s honesty and vulnerability.

I hate to make assumptions, but I figured you guys were just overwhelmed from the pressures of being so fucking handsome.

Have a great night, men.

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ETA:. There’s a point to the wall of words below…

  1. There’s varied levels of depression/anxiety.
  2. There’s varied causes.
  3. You might be able to recognize similar cause/effect in yourself.
  4. Sometimes you can control it by recognizing what you’re going through and what might have led to it.
  5. My advice/perspective/observations are strictly anecdotal.

My dad’s side of the family is wrecked. These guys deal with all types of mental demons. Without going into anything too deeply, for illustration sake I’ll mention my dad’s teeth. They were pulled in his early 40’s for dentures, mainly because he had ground them down to little nubs. The constant gritting and grinding had worn them to nothing.

By the grace of God I do not deal with the same level of struggles that he had, but I do have certain triggers that can put me into a mild state of depression. Simple things like cough medicine or Benadryl. Alcohol is a no-no. If I do partake (we’re talking 2-3 beers here), I know there are going to be a few bad days to follow.

I warn people all the time about taking meds. Not the “hey you shouldn’t take that” kind of warning, but a “listen to your body” kind of warning. All those things they list in commercials? Yeah, those are reactions they’ve seen in studies. Benadryl is a really good example because we all know people who have completely opposite reactions, some sleep, some become hyper. Some of us are significantly more sensitive to certain compounds than others. It’s taken me well into my adulthood to connect some of the dots. Springing from bed in a night terror, or feeling like sobbing, or feeling like carrying on is just more effort than it’s worth… All very real states of mind, all shaped by things ingested. Weird stuff.

Now imagine you’re living in that space without there being identifiable cause/effect type triggers. That’s what I hear from Lane. I LOVED what Terry Bradshaw had to say about his wife being there for him. That’s what Lane needs, is a near and gentle reminder during those times that he can and will come out of it. He has to do his own part to be sure, but for Lane or anyone else, having support that will anchor you to the love and care that others have toward him is important.

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Yeah, oppo reactions are weird. My dad became manic and hallucinatory on Ativan…which is an anti-anxiety drug for those who don’t know. Every hospital trip and follow up rehab hospital stay I or my brother had to flag down the nurses (on each shift) and say…Hey, don’t do Ativan…trust me. don’t.

Most listened, some didn’t, but they figured it out after one shift of dealing with the effects…we were like We Told Youuuuu…

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My buddy worked for a landscaper that was a big pothead. The guy had severe ADHD and when he smoked it would effect him like it was speed.

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Absolutely, brother. Thank you for posting this.

ALL humans have some form of PTSD, and there are levels and layers to it. There are things that get handed down genetically, there are societally programmed components (layers and levels from TV and world influence, down to immediate family), and there are components that are based on your soul/essence, and what you are innately…in your spirit.

Levels and layers of everything - NOTHING is as black and white as people try to make it.

This is a really good post @LineBusy

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There are scientific studies now showing that emotional reaction to traumatic events in a parent’s life are actually encoded in their dna and passed down to their children genetically. Wild and weird stuff.

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Y E S
I get into this stuff, when people are ready for it (most are not). LOL

Soooo important to know you can “code the field” of your own energy and change your DNA. It’s how I learned to use my right arm and fingers again, when there was a 0% chance of that happening, according to my nerve doctor.

We CAN do it, but we have to have ULTIMATE faith.

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All I got was my mom’s 5.9 - 40 time.

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