Watch "How Sean McVay changed the Rams offense to beat Tampa Bay" on YouTube

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I just wanted to share this channel with everyone. This guy really knows his stuff and I figured some of you would enjoy his knowledge and break-down of the different concepts.

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Really cool stuff, man.

Thanks for posting!

Very interesting look!

I’ll start with saying that Stafford looks great to this point and that offense is cooking!

McVay still runs many of his same plays but they are out of the shotgun now and have less motion. An updated philosophy or less need to protect the QB?

The curious tactician in me wonders how to counter.

The McVay offense w/ Goff has always had trouble with the 6 and 1 defense (6 guys at the LOS). It allows defenses to contain the wide spread, blitz from the outside, and drop guys into the middle on passing plays. The weakness is it loses leverage up the middle or deep depending on safeties. The Rams had neither the OL, nor deep WRs to take advantage of deep, so it was a lot of outs and over the middle stuff in traffic.

Now we see they have added a few new weapons in Jackson and Jefferson is playing better than Reynolds. The OL is playing outstanding in pass blocking. Stafford aside from the 1st two series on Sunday looks on point.

So can this offense be stopped and how would you defend it? Would the 6 and 1 still work?

I can’t tell if their OL is legit with a brand new OL coach or they just haven’t played a DL that can wreck them yet. They don’t look as good as the Lions in run blocking but they’ve given Stafford loads of time to pass. Should defenses be blitzing more? Showing more at the LOS? Double teaming Kupp? Dropping into coverage and daring the rams to run more?

The offense does look different with Stafford out there so far even with a lot of similar plays. Can this production level sustain throughout the entire season? What about when the weather turns colder? Will defenses start to adapt?

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Stafford has always preferred shotgun. I know many/most QBs do, but it seems to me like he does more than most.

I’m not the tactician that many here are, but if the weakness of the 6 and 1 defense is deep, that isn’t the defense I’d be playing against Matt with DJax and Jefferson out there.

Matt’s weakness is precision; doing the same thing over and over and over. Make him do a bunch of 4 yard passes in a row perfectly, don’t give him the opportunity to make up for a bunch of mistakes with one bomb, because that cannon of his will kill you in that situation.

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The Rams offense has run 176 plays, DeSean has only been in on 38 of them or 22%.
Van Jefferson has been in on 140 of those plays, 80% of the plays.
Kupp = 161 plays
Woods = 155 plays
Jefferson = 140 plays

McVay seems to prefer Van right now…but I don’t know comes out when DeSean goes in or if DeSean is just that 4th WR added.

Funny, folks this summer nearly had me persuaded that Stafford was going to be in a worse situation than if he had stayed in Detroit.

I was thinking he’d be in a worse OL and RB situation at the least. RB is confirmed to be worse so far. OL is still TBD. I am shocked how well their OL looks so far and would be surprised if they don’t struggle against some teams.

The other xfactor was how he would mesh with McVay. I think that is still TBD but early signs point to he is in a great situation. Goff was too for 2 years when they were winning like crazy. Then adversity hit and it was downhill (even with winning records and playoff wins).

That said, we all knew that McVay is 4/4 with winning seasons and 3/4 with playoff appearances. He’s now a proven coach that he has a prepared and above average team, no matter who or what from a player and asst coaches perspective they have.

You have to pressure Stafford. If he has time, he’ll rip you apart.
He aslo has a quick release. I’d take my chances pressuring him. Press at the LOS and disrupt timing routes, and attack him. High risk/reward, and you’re eventually gonna get torched. If you sit back and play him for the pick, you’ll get systematically torn apart, IMO (now that he’s got a supporting cast).

It’s tough to beat him. He was the #1 ranked QB, while under pressure.

So do you do blitz a CB/SAF/LB every single play and plan to drop a DL here and there to cover the gaps but at least he will have a free rusher coming all the time?

And as an experienced QB, MS gave input for changes that worked…

I think we all agree Matt has a ton more experience to pull from than Goff….

Good for Matt!

I remember a couple years back I asked NFL.com’s Lance Zeirlen on twitter who was the best WR in the draft class at getting separating and he said Van Jefferson.

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Matt has thrown some bad balls, this season, but mostly been on fire. I am not a fan of dropping a DL into coverage. Matt is Smart. While playing from normal game circumstances, and not behind, I think his picks go down. Because his O likes a balanced attack, his total yards won’t be insane, but his efficiency will go WAY up. I feel film room interceptions go down. He’s smart. You can’t do anything every single time, as predictability will get you murdered too.

I feel like making him run for his life is the best way to beat him, but it’s high risk, high reward. Have to be fairly unpredictable, but lean toward more heat. If you let him sit back and get comfortable, he’ll shred you.

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I think you may be over-thinking this. Yes, Mcvay seems to have finally adapted significantly. Pity he couldn’t get there with a QB who made his draft bones in a wide-open shotgun offense…smh…

Better pass pro, better pass catching support( Van J, DeSean), scheme adapted to QB’s strengths. Element of surprise helps.Really hard not to see Goff thriving in this situation, as well.

Stafford deserves credit,too, of course. Experience speeds up decision-making & until the thumb falls off, the arm has been fun to watch. The lack of consistent accuracy passes like a shadow across the sun every game, too, though.
The defensive counters are coming, the injuries will gum up the works somewhat,leaving the QB’s weaknesses exposed, & McVay has never adapted on the fly. It’s never been one counter or one issue that ruined a season.

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Disguise your blitzes and pressure the WR’s at the line, if you can slow the WR’s at the line, he has to wait for his hot-read.

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You can overload blitz Stafford with success. Bring your backers into the A gaps and stunt your pressure to come from the right. Stafford is okay when running right and definitely okay when having to climb the pocket. Your goal is to clog the middle so he can’t step up and make sure he has no option to the right.

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Yep, you’re best option is to collapse the pocket and put a helmet under his throwing hand!

Season 2 Love GIF by LoveIslandUSA

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The Rams/McVay/Goff got a lot better vs the blitz last year & Stafford/ Allen seem even better at diagnosing than Blythe/Goff, the backs doing better as well; a rising tide that’s lifting the whole ship.

McVay’s motion & WR stacks/bunches at the LOS make the circa 2002 Belicheat tactic of mugging the WRs harder to accomplish, not to mention the rule changes that resulted from its nefarious success vs Martz’s GSOT.

It doesn’t have to be a blitz to rattle Stafford. Its actually better if you can execute the principles of containing him without blitzing. That’s what Zimmer and Vikings have done. If I were trying to beat Stafford I would spend a ton of time on Lions/Vikings game film from the last 5 years.

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To what Wes is saying I would only add that the trouble isn’t necessarily *Stafford’s trouble with the pressure (he’s as susceptible to being disturbed by pressure in his face as any pocket QB), rather it was a problem for our OL to pick up the pressure. We’ve had good blockers at RB taking on the free rusher (Kerryon and Riddick before him), but inevitably there have been breakdowns at Guard and/or Center that proved problematic in picking up those stunts and double A-gap blitzes. (Wiggins and Glasgow, probably most in particular.)

ETA: * maybe better said as “isn’t Stafford’s trouble alone”

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